23. Currently figuring shit out with my life. Constantly discovering and obsessing over new television (Hence the URL?). Also watch a shit ton of movies. Terrible at photoshop so I'm just a reblog kind of blog.
Ask me whatever

 

ladyw1nter: I'm ranting about Pacific Rim again, just ignore me.

rosezemlya:

So, I’ve had a couple conversations with some of my non-Internet friends about Pacific Rim. And some like it as much as I do, and some were meh and some where somewhere in between.

The meh or negative people were like, “It’s just a movie about robots and monsters.” In their…

THE MIGHTY MORPHIN ALPHA TWINS EXPLAINED:

horchatita:

KAT IS A FUCKING GENIUS let me tell you what she figured out.

Based on the evidence as follows:

1. The mighty morphin’ Alpha twin thing cannot conceivably be something every werewolf twin does or else they wouldn’t be special enough for Duke’s Super Special Alpha Club.

2. Ethan obviously has a deeply rooted panic about the merging ability as evidenced in ‘Motel California’. What was a pointblank suicidal drive in Boyd (we are not opening the McCall can of worms up in here) was in Ethan a need to cut off whatever the hell was invading his body.

3. The Danny/Ethan relationship seems to be just burdened with glorious foreshadowing of the tragic kind. Ethan’s reaction to Danny’s scaring (on his side, mind you) due to a birth defect may have triggered Ethan’s empathy and veiled offer of the Bite because (and this part is all Kat’s terrifying genius):

Ethan and Aiden were conjoined twins.

Perhaps wolfyness or Alphaness healed their separation scars, but the Alpha form returns them to (and takes them well beyond) their natural state.

This explains Ethan’s complete panic at the idea of this lack of autonomy returning (especially in an intimate moment) and his passive role in the merging process might indicate that when conjoined, Aiden had the majority of mobility or autonomy over their bodies.

Transitions - another tiresome virginity post

uswe:

Something that caught my attention about our murder victims is that, aside from being virgins, they are people who place emphasis on the importance of virginity.

Heather fiercely does not want to be a virgin anymore, in part as a rejection of the identity of being a seventeen year old virgin. Virginity is important enough to her that it would be a part of her essential self-identifier.

Dead guy with the purity ring puts enough weight on virginity to have pledged to stay a virgin and gotten a ring to remind himself. It’s a big deal to him, too.

Emily’s the third dead virgin, and she was visibly nervous. It was her girlfriend’s first time, too, but her girlfriend was happy and trying to make things romantic, possibly to try to ease Emily’s nerves. That would indicate to me at least that she was less nervous herself, possibly because virginity wasn’t a big deal to her.

This all kind of signals people who felt like they were about to have an important transition. So what if it’s not about virginity at all, but about the energy that comes from anticipating change?

weecesting:

spoilertv:

Spoiler TV: Supernatural - Season 9 - Speculation on Sam


This article is a pretty surface level reading that misinterprets and misrepresents Sam’s motives and character in turns and there is literally so much I want to tackle here but I’ll try to hit the biggest points. Here we go:

The problems were contrived, given the fact that Sam didn’t look for Dean in the first place. It’s a choice that I consider widely out of character for him, but there is nothing fans can do about it now.

If you don’t think Sam having a psychotic break (i.e. “my world imploded” in 8.06) and thinking Dean was dead is enough then I’m not sure what to tell you. Sam didn’t abandon Dean in purgatory because he didn’t know Dean was in purgatory. He thought his brother was dead, and if there’s one thing the Winchesters have learned over the years it’s that every time one of them tries to bring the other back from the dead, they pay the price in much bigger ways. With that in mind it makes sense that Sam wouldn’t have tried to find a bargain or deal to bring Dean back, even if he was in the right mind to do so. What Carver failed to do is to show us how broken Sam was after the S7 finale instead of just having him say it. What “fans” can do about it now is to actually attempt a more than cursory understanding of Sam and canon and see that “Sam not looking for Dean” is an inaccurate simplification of what actually occurred. But I’ll get to that soon enough:

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: This was so wonderful to read: "A dwarf's perspective on Tyrion Lannister"

theongreyjoy:

This is a post I found on Reddit’s /r/asoiaf section. While it’s more of a feelings post rather than meta, It was a really rewarding post to read through because I am pretty sure this is the only time i’ve been able to read a post where the author can actually attest to…

Hannibal Lecter and the subversion of the Male Gaze

noonturnsmidnight:

Let’s talk Hannibal and feminism for a second. 
Specifically, let’s talk about what makes Lecter’s character so appealing to a female audience and why that makes so many people uncomfortable. 

(Takes the book & movie canons into account. TW for discussion of murder, cannibalism and violence as well as mentions of sexual violence.)

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timelordsatan:

(made rebloggable by request)
just to add a few more things to what I just said:
I think one of the most frustrating things about Sam’s character this season (and arguably in some parts of seasons 6 and 7) is that his character doesn’t seem to be an active participant in the storyline anymore. For the first five or six seasons, Sam has been an integral part of the show’s mythology (i.e. psychic powers, special child, saving Dean from hell, demon blood, vessel for Lucifer, Soulless!Sam* etc). The thing about Sam and Dean, up to the more later seasons, is that they encompassed two sorts of heroic molds. They are both equally important catalysts. Sam is very much a catalyst for the myth arcs and plots. Dean is very much the carrier of the emotional arcs. He is the (unreliable) narrator that I would even go as far as to say is a catalyst for the audience.
I don’t think that’s necessarily bad in itself. There’s a really good post that explores how Sam and Dean are characters that have heroic attributes from different genres (Sam a “Harry Potter” sort of deal, Dean being the horror movie protagonist), and you know what, that’s part of why their dynamic is so fascinating, why their characters bounce off each other in a way that shouldn’t work, but it does.
However, in later seasons, Sam doesn’t have as much interaction with the overall mythology of the show. This isn’t necessarily the problem though. The problem is that while Sam starts to become less integral to the myth the way he was in the past, Dean stays as the narrator. As Dean becomes more integral to the mythological aspect of the show (the way Sam was) as well as the emotional aspect, Sam starts to fade into the background. And again, it isn’t the fact that the story isn’t “what the fuck is wrong with Sam” anymore that’s the problem. The problem is that now you’ve shifted the two aspects onto Dean.
People may or may not disagree with me, but I very much feel this way. I think the Samelia storyline is evidence enough. It would have been different if the show had decided to do a successful role reversal, and make Dean the holder of the myth arc and make it from Sam’s point of view. But instead it gave both elements to Dean.
There’s more to it (how Sam is ALWAYS the one who has to apologize, how the narrative makes Dean right again and again and again, how we know about Dean’s hobbies and treasured possessions but next to nothing about Sam’s besides a few passing comments), but I feel like that’s a huge element that really affects the overall development of Sam’s character.

timelordsatan:

(made rebloggable by request)

just to add a few more things to what I just said:

I think one of the most frustrating things about Sam’s character this season (and arguably in some parts of seasons 6 and 7) is that his character doesn’t seem to be an active participant in the storyline anymore. For the first five or six seasons, Sam has been an integral part of the show’s mythology (i.e. psychic powers, special child, saving Dean from hell, demon blood, vessel for Lucifer, Soulless!Sam* etc). The thing about Sam and Dean, up to the more later seasons, is that they encompassed two sorts of heroic molds. They are both equally important catalysts. Sam is very much a catalyst for the myth arcs and plots. Dean is very much the carrier of the emotional arcs. He is the (unreliable) narrator that I would even go as far as to say is a catalyst for the audience.

I don’t think that’s necessarily bad in itself. There’s a really good post that explores how Sam and Dean are characters that have heroic attributes from different genres (Sam a “Harry Potter” sort of deal, Dean being the horror movie protagonist), and you know what, that’s part of why their dynamic is so fascinating, why their characters bounce off each other in a way that shouldn’t work, but it does.

However, in later seasons, Sam doesn’t have as much interaction with the overall mythology of the show. This isn’t necessarily the problem though. The problem is that while Sam starts to become less integral to the myth the way he was in the past, Dean stays as the narrator. As Dean becomes more integral to the mythological aspect of the show (the way Sam was) as well as the emotional aspect, Sam starts to fade into the background. And again, it isn’t the fact that the story isn’t “what the fuck is wrong with Sam” anymore that’s the problem. The problem is that now you’ve shifted the two aspects onto Dean.

People may or may not disagree with me, but I very much feel this way. I think the Samelia storyline is evidence enough. It would have been different if the show had decided to do a successful role reversal, and make Dean the holder of the myth arc and make it from Sam’s point of view. But instead it gave both elements to Dean.

There’s more to it (how Sam is ALWAYS the one who has to apologize, how the narrative makes Dean right again and again and again, how we know about Dean’s hobbies and treasured possessions but next to nothing about Sam’s besides a few passing comments), but I feel like that’s a huge element that really affects the overall development of Sam’s character.

(Source: freddiefrowns)

Mistakes Were Made: Okay, so the thing that really got me about this weeks episode is that...

ladyw1nter:

alis-in-space:

Okay, so the thing that really got me about this weeks episode is that Stiles gave up.

After Gerard kicked him around a little bit, he just went home and did nothing.

Scott is calling and he doesn’t answer.

He knows Erica and Boyd are in trouble and he doesn’t tell anyone or start making plans.

He knows shit with Jackson is still going down. He knows Gerard is still making people’s lives hard. He knows that there are so many giant terrible important problems to be dealt with.

And what does he do?

He sits in his room and just. Does nothing.

This is the first time we’ve ever seen Stiles not doing anything. Not just in the face of a crisis, but ever.

But the thing with Gerard, that was the last straw. Because Gerard pointed out to him the thing he’s been worrying about the whole time. That he, Stiles, is nothing but a liability. All he’s every going to do no matter how hard he tries to help, no matter how much he sacrifices, is hurt the people he cares about.

At least half of what he yelled at Lydia was really directed at himself. Because all he can see is his dad’s face at another funeral. His dad ALONE, and it’s all his fault. Because he’s useless, because he’s a pawn, because he can’t even save himself. Not really. Because he keeps being used to hurt the people he loves.

Which is heartbreaking. And watching Stiles sit in his room and DO NOTHING was the most heartbreaking thing in the world, because he was full ready to let himself drown.

And the thing is, that episode tag. That fluffy little Scott & Stiles BFF moment didn’t help at all.

Because Stiles’s conversation with his dad? It may have motivated him to go and help, but once again he was useless. He was just the ride, he just watched stuff happen while Scott held him back. So what did he ultimately take from his conversation with his dad? Probably something like “well, lacrosse is the one thing you can not be useless at” and so what does he do? Start practicing fucking lacrosse so he can be the team captain.

Because the kid is drowning. Head all the way underwater, and t season resolved NOTHING.

He’s STILL going through hell, and nobody has stopped to help him yet, because nobody can see it.*

Which is why this episode made me antsy more than anything, because I’m still waiting for the emotional fallout.

*(except his dad, who knows there is a problem, but who doesn’t know what he problem is)

Yup! It feels sorta like essentially Stiles is at where Jackson and Lydia was at end of Season 1; and now look how Season 2 turned out.

Season 3 of the Stiles and Derek, here we come?

(Source: alisand)

nerdylittledudewithwings:

When Stiles was only five, he’d run off when the Sheriff had turned to check the ripeness of a display of watermelon at the local bargain mart. And it had taken the Sheriff a minute, after deciding that there was no way he and Stiles could finish an entire melon themselves, to look down at the ground where he would usually find Stiles tugging at his sleeve.
But Stiles was gone. 
Panic welled in his chest and he spun around so fast he nearly knocked the display table over.
“Stiles!”
And it had taken a moment—one long, utterly terrifying moment—but then Stiles had poked his head around the corner of the next aisle and given his dad a toothy grin.
Now, on the chilled lacrosse field, the Sheriff can hardly breathe.
“Where’s Stiles?”
No one is listening. He turnes, eyes flitting desperately from face to face. Searching for that goofy grin, those overlong limbs.
“Where the hell is my son?!”
Stiles doesn’t appear this time.
And it’s like losing her all over again, that same riptide of grief and despair and terror coursing through him, and it’s all he can do to keep himself from collapsing right there on the field, the glare of the stadium lights forcing him to blink back his tears.

nerdylittledudewithwings:

When Stiles was only five, he’d run off when the Sheriff had turned to check the ripeness of a display of watermelon at the local bargain mart. And it had taken the Sheriff a minute, after deciding that there was no way he and Stiles could finish an entire melon themselves, to look down at the ground where he would usually find Stiles tugging at his sleeve.

But Stiles was gone. 

Panic welled in his chest and he spun around so fast he nearly knocked the display table over.

“Stiles!”

And it had taken a moment—one long, utterly terrifying moment—but then Stiles had poked his head around the corner of the next aisle and given his dad a toothy grin.

Now, on the chilled lacrosse field, the Sheriff can hardly breathe.

“Where’s Stiles?”

No one is listening. He turnes, eyes flitting desperately from face to face. Searching for that goofy grin, those overlong limbs.

“Where the hell is my son?!”

Stiles doesn’t appear this time.

And it’s like losing her all over again, that same riptide of grief and despair and terror coursing through him, and it’s all he can do to keep himself from collapsing right there on the field, the glare of the stadium lights forcing him to blink back his tears.

fuckingniara:

Can I talk about Boyd and Erica for a second?

These two baby betas joined the pack so they could be strong, so they could have a place where they belonged and it fucking kills me. They didn’t sign up to be hunted, to be even bigger outcasts than they were, so of course they run. They run because they’re 16 and scared and they took the bite so they wouldn’t have to feel that way ever again. So they could be part of a pack.

The looks on their faces when they tell Derek about the howls in the forest says it all, they don’t listen to him because they want so bad for it to be dozens of wolves, ones that know what they’re doing, ones that can protect them because they’re 16 and scared and they didn’t sign up for a war.

When Boyd grabs Erica’s hand, even without romantic implications, it’s because they’re all the other has and he takes her hand to let her know he’s there, to let her know he’ll protect her because even if he’s scared, she’s got it worse because Erica’s had to deal with fear so much longer than he has so he gets the fuck over it and takes her hand and that’s what pack really is right there. It’s being 16 and scared but putting on a brave face because you’ve got something worth protecting, something worth demanding to be left behind to die for, something worth turning back and getting shot with arrow after arrow for.

And I just wish Derek could see that. See how many people he has willing to turn back for him, to take an arrow for him, to tread water for hours for him because they know how willingly he’d stay behind to face gunfire and alphas and kanimas to keep them safe. That he could see how strong having someone to lean on makes you.

(Source: aceaang)

nerdylittledudewithwings:

Also can we please talk about how all this time Stiles has felt like every single day is a panic attack?

He’s lived this entire season with that tension in his chest. With that shortness of breath, with that utter fear of tipping over the edge and spiraling out of control. With the weight of the world on his shoulders and he’s trying so desperately to keep his feet underneath him, to keep pushing forward, because people are depending on him.

That’s every single day for Stiles.

He’s breaking.

And the people around him don’t have any idea.